How to copy LOBs

The Issue

Assume we must copy a table that contains a LOB. There can be different reasons for this. For example, if the table is too fragmented or if there is no more space in the current tablespace.

The straightforward approach with Insert / * + append parallel (n) enable_parallel_dml * / simply to copy the data fails, however. It takes a long time at first. You can see that the time is spent inserting and not reading. How you copy the LOBS is crucial. The rest of the time is comparatively negligible.

The Insert .. Select approach has another problem: There are no partial results. Either you succeed or you have to start all over again.

Searching the Internet I found a blog by Marek Läll that deals with the subject of copying LOBs [1].

The core of the matter is that the LOB locator (LOB address) has not yet been determined at the time of the insert. A new LOB must be created, which means you also need a new locator. As a result, the LOB to be copied is first written to the TEMP tablespace. Then the new locator is determined and then the LOB is copied again from the TEMP tablespace to the actual target. Läll now suggests another way: First an empty LOB is written, its locator is then read via SELECT .. FOR UPDATE. The source LOB can be copied there in one go. This saves you from writing and reading the LOB, which is important. As already mentioned, the most important thing for efficiency is how the LOBs are treated.

I implemented the code in PL / SQL and optimized it a bit, rewritten it to BULK and avoided the SELECT .. FOR UPDATE via the returning clause.

The code is very efficient compared to other approaches I tested. In my real application, I can easily get to 1.5 million rows / hour with a parallel 24.

Copy Part

To illustrate my code let us assume this simple table:

CREATE table doc_table( doc_id Number,
                        document BLOB); 

The table has a BLOB column called document.

DECLARE
   TYPE t_BLOB_tab IS TABLE OF BLOB; 
   v_blob t_BLOB_tab;
   v_blob_length NUMBER;
   CURSOR c1 is
      SELECT /*+ noparallel */ doc_id , document   -- 1: noparallel hint
	 FROM doc_table 
   	WHERE ROWID BETWEEN :start_id AND :end_id;  -- 2: Start and End Rowid
   TYPE c1_tab IS TABLE OF c1%rowtype;
   v_c1_tab c1_tab;	
   c_limit PLS_INTEGER := 10000;			 
 BEGIN 
 OPEN c1;
 LOOP
	 FETCH c1 bulk collect INTO v_c1_tab LIMIT c_limit;
	 EXIT WHEN v_c1_tab.COUNT=0;
	 FORALL i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT
	    INSERT INTO doc_table_new (doc_id , document P) -- 3: Conventional Insert
			   VALUES (v_c1_tab(i).doc_id, empty_blob())
                       RETURNING document BULK COLLECT INTO v_blob; -- 4: Loblocator of new LOB
	 FOR i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT 
	 LOOP
	    v_blob_length := DBMS_LOB.GETLENGTH(v_c1_tab(i).document);
	    IF nvl(v_blob_length,0) > 0 THEN -- 5: DBMS_LOB.COPY will throw an exception
		DBMS_LOB.COPY(v_blob(i),       -- for empty LOBS
                           v_c1_tab(i).document,
				 v_blob_length);
	    END IF;
	 END LOOP;
	 COMMIT; 
 END LOOP;
 COMMIT;
END;
/

Annotations:

1.       The anonymous block is parallelized in the next step via DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE. It would be illogical to parallelize again within a parallel process.

2.       The start and end id must be used in the central select. They must not be declared, they are set from the DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE framework.

3.       A direct path write would be possible here using the APPEND_VALUES hint. I refrained from it so as not to provoke an exclusive table lock. I have not tested whether this actually would be the case. I am so satisfied with the performance of the solution described here that I consider a test to be unnecessary.

4.       The return saves a SELECT .. FOR UPDATE.

5.       DBMS_LOB.COPY is the fastest way to copy and seems to use a direct path.

Parallelize

I could have called a stored function via parallel SQL in order to parallelize the approach. The decision to use DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE was rather by instinct. There are some objective points for PL/SQL parallelization, however. E.g. a stored function would have resulted in many context switches. DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE allows you to stay in PL / SQL. In addition, the code below will also work with Standard Edition.

I also did some tests with parallel SQL and functions, but never got them to scale.  I would not exclude that there is a better approach than the one I present here. However, compared to the alternatives I have seen I rather like the approach presented below.

Here is the code for parallelization, I highlighted the anonymous block that we discussed in the previous paragraph.

DECLARE
 l_sql_stmt CONSTANT VARCHAR2 ( 20000 ) := 
	 q'[DECLARE
		 TYPE t_BLOB_tab IS TABLE OF BLOB; 
		 v_blob t_BLOB_tab;
		 v_blob_length NUMBER;
		 CURSOR c1 is
		    SELECT /*+ noparallel */ doc_id , document 
		      FROM doc_table 
		     WHERE ROWID BETWEEN :start_id AND :end_id;
		 TYPE c1_tab IS TABLE OF c1%rowtype;
		v_c1_tab c1_tab;	
        c_limit PLS_INTEGER := 10000;			
	 BEGIN 
	 OPEN c1;
	 LOOP
		 FETCH c1 bulk collect INTO v_c1_tab LIMIT c_limit;
		 EXIT WHEN v_c1_tab.COUNT=0;
		 FORALL i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT
		    INSERT INTO doc_table (doc_id , document) 
				   VALUES (v_c1_tab(i)."doc_id", empty_blob()) 
                             RETURNING document BULK COLLECT INTO v_blob; 
		 FOR i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT 
		 LOOP
			 v_blob_length := DBMS_LOB.GETLENGTH(v_c1_tab(i).document);
			 IF nvl(v_blob_length,0) > 0 THEN
				DBMS_LOB.COPY(v_blob(i),
							 v_c1_tab(i).document,
							 v_blob_length);
			 END IF;
		 END LOOP;
		 COMMIT; 
	 END LOOP;
	 COMMIT;
	END; ]';

 l_chunk_sql CONSTANT VARCHAR2 ( 10000 ) :=       -- 1: chunking statement. Breaks the input data
	 q'[SELECT min(r) start_id, max(r) end_id  -- into equal size pieces
		 FROM (
		SELECT ntile(10) over (order by rowid) grp, rowid r –- 2: 10 chunks will be produced
		 FROM doc_table                                     -- this can be equal or a multiple
		 )                                                -- of the parallel_level
	 GROUP BY grp]';
 l_try INTEGER;
 l_status INTEGER;
 l_task_name CONSTANT VARCHAR2( 20 ) := 'BLOB_MOVE';
BEGIN
 BEGIN
 dbms_parallel_execute.drop_task( l_task_name );
 EXCEPTION
 WHEN others then
 null;
 END;
 dbms_parallel_execute.create_task( l_task_name );
 dbms_parallel_execute.create_chunks_by_sql(l_task_name, l_chunk_sql, true);

 dbms_parallel_execute.run_task(
 task_name => l_task_name,
 sql_stmt  => l_sql_stmt,
 language_flag => dbms_sql.native,
 parallel_level => 10 –- 3: that many processes will be generated                 
 );
 
 dbms_output.put_line( 'DONE..' || dbms_parallel_execute.task_status(l_task_name));
 
END;
/

Annotations:

  1. There are several ways to divide the work. The chunking query is the most flexible. The search conditions here must also be found again in cursor c1.
  2. Ntile (10) means that the result of the query will hopefully be divided into 10 equal sections.

 

References:

Wie man am besten einen LOB kopiert

Das Grundproblem

Wir müssen eine Tabelle, die einen LOB enthält, umkopieren. Das kann unterschiedliche Gründe haben. Beispielsweise wenn die Tabelle zu fragmentiert ist, oder wenn auf dem aktuellen Tablespace kein Platz mehr ist.

Der gradlinige Ansatz mit Insert /*+ append parallel(n) enable_parallel_dml */ die Daten einfach umzukopieren scheitert aber.  Es dauert zunächst sehr lange. Man kann erkennen, dass die Zeit beim Einfügen und nicht beim Lesen anfällt.  Hier wiederum ist das Kopieren der LOBS entscheidend. Der Rest der Zeit fällt vergleichsweise kaum ins Gewicht.

Noch ein Problem hat der Insert .. Select Ansatz: Es gibt keine Teilergebnisse. Entweder es geht alles gut, oder man muss wieder von vorne anfangen.

Beim Suchen im Internet fand ich einen Blog von Marek Läll, der sich mit dem Thema LOB kopieren befasst [1].

Der Kern der Sache ist, dass der LOB Locator (LOB Adresse) zum Zeitpunkt des Inserts noch nicht feststeht. Es muss ein neuer LOB angelegt werden, das heißt man braucht auch einen neuen Locator. In der Folge wird der zu kopierende LOB zunächst in den TEMP Tablespace geschrieben wird. Dann wird der neue Locator ermittelt und dann wird der LOB vom TEMP Tablespace noch einmal in das eigentliche Ziel kopiert. Läll schlägt jetzt einen anderen Weg vor: Es wird zunächst ein empty LOB geschrieben, dessen Locator wird dann über SELECT .. FOR UPDATE gelesen. Dorthin kann der Quell LOB in einem Zug kopiert werden. Dadurch erspart man sich einmal Schreiben und Lesen des LOB, was wichtig ist. Wie schon erwähnt zählt für die Effizienz vor allem wie die LOBs behandelt werden.

Ich habe den Code in PL/SQL realisiert und noch etwas optimiert, also auf BULK umgeschrieben und den SELECT .. FOR UPDATE über die returning Klausel vermieden.

Der Code ist sehr effizient verglichen mit anderen Ansätzen, die ich getestet habe. In meinem echten Anwendungsfall komme ich locker bei parallel 24 auf 1,5 Millionen Rows/Stunde.

Kopieren

Um das folgende Beispiel verständlich zu machen, erstelle ich einmal die folgende einfache Tabelle, die kopiert werden soll:

CREATE table doc_table( doc_id Number,
                        document BLOB); 

Die Tabelle hat eine BLOB Spalte namens document.

DECLARE
   TYPE t_BLOB_tab IS TABLE OF BLOB; 
   v_blob t_BLOB_tab;
   v_blob_length NUMBER;
   CURSOR c1 is
      SELECT /*+ noparallel */ doc_id , document   -- 1: noparallel hint
	 FROM doc_table 
   	WHERE ROWID BETWEEN :start_id AND :end_id;  -- 2: Start and End Rowid
   TYPE c1_tab IS TABLE OF c1%rowtype;
   v_c1_tab c1_tab;	
   c_limit PLS_INTEGER := 10000;			 
 BEGIN 
 OPEN c1;
 LOOP
	 FETCH c1 bulk collect INTO v_c1_tab LIMIT c_limit;
	 EXIT WHEN v_c1_tab.COUNT=0;
	 FORALL i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT
	    INSERT INTO doc_table_new (doc_id , document P) -- 3: Conventional Insert
			   VALUES (v_c1_tab(i).doc_id, empty_blob())
                       RETURNING document BULK COLLECT INTO v_blob; -- 4: Loblocator of new LOB
	 FOR i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT 
	 LOOP
	    v_blob_length := DBMS_LOB.GETLENGTH(v_c1_tab(i).document);
	    IF nvl(v_blob_length,0) > 0 THEN -- 5: DBMS_LOB.COPY will throw an exception
		DBMS_LOB.COPY(v_blob(i),       -- for empty LOBS
                           v_c1_tab(i).document,
				 v_blob_length);
	    END IF;
	 END LOOP;
	 COMMIT; 
 END LOOP;
 COMMIT;
END;
/

Zu den Kommentaren:

  1. Der anonymous Block wird im nächsten Schritt über DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE parallelisiert. Es wäre unlogisch innerhalb eines parallelen Prozesses noch einmal zu parallelisieren.
  2. Die Start – und die End id müssen im zentralen Select verwendet werden. Man darf sie nicht definieren, sie werden über DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE gesetzt.
  3. Hier wäre über den Hint APPEND_VALUES ein direct path write möglich. Ich habe davon abgesehen, um nicht einen exclusive table lock zu provozieren. Ob dies tatsächlich der Fall wäre, habe ich nicht getestet. Ich bin mit der Perfomance der hier beschrieben Lösung so zufrieden, dass ich einen Test für unnötig erachte.
  4. Das Returning erspart einen SELECT .. FOR UPDATE.
  5. COPY ist die schnellste Art zu kopieren und scheint einen direct path zu verwenden.

 

Parallelisieren

Hier hätte man auch über paralleles SQL eine stored function rufen können, um die Lösung zu parallelisieren. Die Entscheidung für DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE war eher instinktiv begründet. Jedoch wäre es bei einer stored Function zu sehr vielen context Switches gekommen.  DBMS_PARALLEL_EXECUTE erlaubt es in PL/SQL zu bleiben.

Einige Tests mit parallelem SQL waren in der Tat auch wenig effizient.

Hier noch der Code zum Parallelisieren, den anonymen Block, den wir besprochen haben, habe ich markiert.

DECLARE
 l_sql_stmt CONSTANT VARCHAR2 ( 20000 ) := 
	 q'[DECLARE
		 TYPE t_BLOB_tab IS TABLE OF BLOB; 
		 v_blob t_BLOB_tab;
		 v_blob_length NUMBER;
		 CURSOR c1 is
		    SELECT /*+ noparallel */ doc_id , document 
		      FROM doc_table 
		     WHERE ROWID BETWEEN :start_id AND :end_id;
		 TYPE c1_tab IS TABLE OF c1%rowtype;
		v_c1_tab c1_tab;	
        c_limit PLS_INTEGER := 10000;			
	 BEGIN 
	 OPEN c1;
	 LOOP
		 FETCH c1 bulk collect INTO v_c1_tab LIMIT c_limit;
		 EXIT WHEN v_c1_tab.COUNT=0;
		 FORALL i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT
		    INSERT INTO doc_table (doc_id , document) 
				   VALUES (v_c1_tab(i)."doc_id", empty_blob()) 
                             RETURNING document BULK COLLECT INTO v_blob; 
		 FOR i IN 1 .. v_c1_tab.COUNT 
		 LOOP
			 v_blob_length := DBMS_LOB.GETLENGTH(v_c1_tab(i).document);
			 IF nvl(v_blob_length,0) > 0 THEN
				DBMS_LOB.COPY(v_blob(i),
							 v_c1_tab(i).document,
							 v_blob_length);
			 END IF;
		 END LOOP;
		 COMMIT; 
	 END LOOP;
	 COMMIT;
	END; ]';

 l_chunk_sql CONSTANT VARCHAR2 ( 10000 ) :=       -- 1: chunking statement. Breaks the input data
	 q'[SELECT min(r) start_id, max(r) end_id  -- into equal size pieces
		 FROM (
		SELECT ntile(10) over (order by rowid) grp, rowid r –- 2: 10 chunks will be produced
		 FROM doc_table                                     -- this can be equal or a multiple
		 )                                                -- of the parallel_level
	 GROUP BY grp]';
 l_try INTEGER;
 l_status INTEGER;
 l_task_name CONSTANT VARCHAR2( 20 ) := 'BLOB_MOVE';
BEGIN
 BEGIN
 dbms_parallel_execute.drop_task( l_task_name );
 EXCEPTION
 WHEN others then
 null;
 END;
 dbms_parallel_execute.create_task( l_task_name );
 dbms_parallel_execute.create_chunks_by_sql(l_task_name, l_chunk_sql, true);

 dbms_parallel_execute.run_task(
 task_name => l_task_name,
 sql_stmt  => l_sql_stmt,
 language_flag => dbms_sql.native,
 parallel_level => 10 –- 3: that many processes will be generated                 
 );
 
 dbms_output.put_line( 'DONE..' || dbms_parallel_execute.task_status(l_task_name));
 
END;
/

Zu den Kommentaren:

  1. Es gibt mehrere Möglichkeiten die Arbeit aufzuteilen. Die Chunking Query ist die flexibelste. Die Suchbedingen hier müssen auch im Cursor c1 noch einmal zu finden sein.
  2. Ntile (10) heißt, dass das Ergebnis der Abfrage in 10 hoffentlich gleich große Abschnitte einteilt.

Quellen:

Oracle SQL Tuning: Unmögliche Optimizer Hints

Englisch Version here: https://www.dbconcepts.at/oracle-sql-tuning-impossible-optimizer-hints/

Query Blöcke

Ich war bis jetzt der Meinung, dass ein Optimizer Hint nur innerhalb seines Query Blocks wirkt, außer man qualifiziert den Hint mit dem Query Block Namen [1].

Man kann beispielsweise Viewnamen in einem Hint nicht wirksam angeben.

In meiner Untersuchung zur Verbesserung des Statspack [2] habe ich gesehen, dass das nicht immer stimmt und wollte diese genauer untersuchen.

Ausgangslage

Meine Testbeispiele erstelle ich im Scott Schema, so dass jeder meinen Test nachvollziehen kann.

Mittels des Optimizer Hints werde ich einen schlechten Plan erzwingen, damit eindeutig ist, dass der Optimizer den Plan unfreiwillig und durch den Hint gewählt hat.

Für die Tests habe ich Oracle Version 19c verwendet, um gleich die neue Hint Report Funktion nutzen zu können.

Die Pläne habe ich mit dem folgenden Statement angezeigt:

select * from dbms_xplan.display_cursor(format=>'TYPICAL +hint_report')
;

Hier ist unser Beispiel Statement:

SELECT ename,
       dname,
       sal,
       grade
FROM salgrade s,
    (
        SELECT ename,
               sal,
               dname
          FROM emp    e,
               dept   d
         WHERE e.deptno = d.deptno
           AND ename = 'SCOTT'
    ) de
WHERE de.sal BETWEEN losal AND hisal;

Ohne weitere Angabe erzeugt der Optimizer den folgenden Plan:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name     | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |          |       |       |     7 (100)|          |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                 |          |     1 |    94 |     7   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS                |          |     1 |    55 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL          | EMP      |     1 |    33 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   4 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| DEPT     |     1 |    22 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PK_DEPT  |     1 |       |     0   (0)|          |
|*  6 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL           | SALGRADE |     1 |    39 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   3 - filter("ENAME"='SCOTT')
   5 - access("E"."DEPTNO"="D"."DEPTNO")
   6 - filter(("SAL">="LOSAL" AND "SAL"<="HISAL"))

Versuchen wir es nun mit einem Hint.
In unserem Hint erzwingen wir, dass der Optimizer mit der Tabelle dept beginnt, was er freiwillig nicht machen würde.

SELECT /*+ leading(d) */ ename,
       dname,
       sal,
       grade
FROM
    salgrade s,
    (
        SELECT ename,
               sal,
               dname
          FROM emp    e,
               dept   d
         WHERE e.deptno = d.deptno
           AND ename = 'SCOTT'
    ) de
WHERE de.sal BETWEEN losal AND hisal;

Gegen meine Erwartung wird der Hint befolgt, obwohl er sich auf einen Alias in einem anderen Query Block bezieht.

Diesmal ist auch ein Hint Report dabei, da es einen Hint gibt.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name     | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT    |          |       |       |     9 (100)|          |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS       |          |     1 |    94 |     9   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   HASH JOIN         |          |     1 |    55 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| DEPT     |     4 |    88 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  4 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| EMP      |     1 |    33 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL | SALGRADE |     1 |    39 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - access("E"."DEPTNO"="D"."DEPTNO")
   4 - filter("ENAME"='SCOTT')
   5 - filter(("SAL">="LOSAL" AND "SAL"<="HISAL"))
Hint Report (identified by operation id / Query Block Name / Object Alias):
Total hints for statement: 1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1 -  SEL$F5BB74E1
           -  leading(d)

Eigentlich hätte der Hint gar nicht funktionieren dürfen.

Der Hint befindet sich in der Hauptabfrage und referenziert ein Objekt in einem anderen Query Block.

Weshalb geht es wohl doch?

Wie man sieht wurde aber die Unterabfrage aufgelöst und mit der Hauptabfrage verschmolzen. Man spricht hier von einem Simple View Merging.

Ein Simple View Merging ist eine sogenannte Transformation. Der Optimizer schreibt die Abfrage um.

Durch die Transformation gibt es nur noch einen Query Block für die Abfrage.

Das könnte der Grund sein, dass der Leading Hint funktioniert.
Wird der obige Hint noch wirken, wenn man die Transformation verbietet?

SELECT /*+ leading(d) */ ename,
       dname,
       sal,
       grade
FROM
    salgrade s,
    (
        SELECT /*+ NO_MERGE */  ename,
               sal,
               dname
          FROM emp    e,
               dept   d
         WHERE e.deptno = d.deptno
           AND ename = 'SCOTT'
    ) de
WHERE de.sal BETWEEN losal AND hisal;

In der Tat wird der Leading Hint jetzt nicht mehr befolgt.

Das ist typisch für das nicht funktionieren von Hints. Die Transformation erfolgt vor der Optimierung.

Dadurch werden zwei unterschiedliche Query Blocks erzwungen.
Das direkte Referenzieren eines anderen Query Blocks funktioniert dann nicht mehr.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                      | Name     | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT               |          |       |       |     7 (100)|          |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                  |          |     1 |    68 |     7   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   VIEW                         |          |     1 |    29 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |    NESTED LOOPS                |          |     1 |    55 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   4 |     NESTED LOOPS               |          |     1 |    55 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL         | EMP      |     1 |    33 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |      INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PK_DEPT  |     1 |       |     0   (0)|          |
|   7 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| DEPT     |     1 |    22 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  8 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL            | SALGRADE |     1 |    39 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   5 - filter("ENAME"='SCOTT')
   6 - access("E"."DEPTNO"="D"."DEPTNO")
   8 - filter(("DE"."SAL">="LOSAL" AND "DE"."SAL"<="HISAL"))
Hint Report (identified by operation id / Query Block Name / Object Alias):
Total hints for statement: 2 (U - Unused (1))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1 -  SEL$1
         U -  leading(d)
   3 -  SEL$2
           -  NO_MERGE

Der Hint Report zeigt ebenfalls an, dass der Leading Hint nicht befolgt wird.

Im Statspack sah ich aber diese Variante des Hints:

SELECT /*+ leading(de.d) */ ename,
       dname,
       sal,
       grade
FROM
    salgrade s,
    (
        SELECT /*+ NO_MERGE */  ename,
               sal,
               dname
          FROM emp    e,
               dept   d
         WHERE e.deptno = d.deptno
           AND ename = 'SCOTT'
    ) de
WHERE de.sal BETWEEN losal AND hisal;

Das Qualifizieren mit dem Alias der Unterabfrage sollte eigentlich nicht funktionieren.

Der Alias der Unterabfrage ist kein Query Block Name.

Jedoch, es geht trotzdem:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation            | Name     | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT     |          |       |       |     9 (100)|          |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS        |          |     1 |    68 |     9   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   VIEW               |          |     1 |    29 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |    HASH JOIN         |          |     1 |    55 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| DEPT     |     4 |    88 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| EMP      |     1 |    33 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL  | SALGRADE |     1 |    39 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   3 - access("E"."DEPTNO"="D"."DEPTNO")
   5 - filter("ENAME"='SCOTT')
   6 - filter(("DE"."SAL">="LOSAL" AND "DE"."SAL"<="HISAL"))
Hint Report (identified by operation id / Query Block Name / Object Alias):
Total hints for statement: 2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
   3 -  SEL$2
           -  leading(de.d)
           -  NO_MERGE

Fazit

Die Möglichkeit mit dem Alias einer Subquery zu Hinten erleichtert das Hinten von komplexen Abfragen.

Aufgrund des Hint Reports kann man sehen, dass der Hint korrekt verstanden wird.

Wie so vieles im Kontext von Hints ist auch diese Option nicht dokumentiert.

Ich habe die Abfrage von Version 11.2.0.4. bis 19.0 getestet und sie funktionierte immer.

Statt mit einer Unterabfrage in der From Klausel funktioniert es auch mit einer View.

Jedoch muss auch hier, wenn die View einen Alias bekommt, der Alias im Hint verwendet werden.

Jonathan Lewis hat mich darauf hingewiesen, dass die Art von Hints offiziell erlaubt ist.

Es handelt sich um global table hints [3].

Diese besonders nützliche Art des Hints ist leider noch zu wenig bekannt. Jedenfalls habe ich sie in meiner Praxis noch nicht angetroffen.

Quellen

Oracle Statspack verbessern: Schnellere Snapshots – Teil1

Oracle Statspack verbessern: Schnellere Snapshots – Teil1

Ausgangslage: Langsamer Statspack Snapshot

Auf verschiedenen Standard Edition Datenbanken sieht man immer wieder den Statspack Snapshot lange laufen.

Dies ist für mich als Consultant sehr unangenehm.
Oft muss ich den Kunden sagen, dass das Statspack auf einer Standard Edition Datenbank unverzichtbar ist.

Und dann sieht mein Kunde, wie der Statspack Snapshot minutenlang einen der kostbaren, limitierten Cores blockiert.

Ich beschloss, etwas dagegen zu unternehmen.
Bei näherer Betrachtung erkennt man zwei Statements, die die Datenbank belasten.

In erster Linie ist dies:

INSERT INTO stats$sql_plan

Aber auch dieser Befehl läuft lange:

INSERT INTO stats$seg_stat

Grundsätzliches: Hints im Statspack

Man hört oft, dass man Hints so wenig wie möglich machen soll und lieber andere Mittel verwenden soll, um den Optimizer zu steuern.

Gute Statistiken zum Beispiel.
Ich bin auch dieser Meinung.
Allerdings gibt es auch Ausnahmen.

Bei Tools wie Statspack kann man sich nicht darauf verlassen, dass die Statistiken immer aktuell sind.

Es werden auch interne Tabellen X$ verwendet. Nicht jeder DBA macht fixed table stats und selbst wenn, schwanken diese Statistiken oft stark.

Ein Tool wie Statspack muss immer zuverlässig laufen.
Glücklicherweise ist bei den zwei Statspack Queries die wir betrachten werden, ziemlich klar wie der Plan auszusehen hat.

Hints stellen also kein großes Risiko dar. Jedoch habe ich dennoch so wenig wie möglich festgelegt.

Statement : INSERT INTO stats$sql_plan

Das Problem wird in der MOS Note 2182680.1 behandelt.

In dieser Note wird vorgeschlagen eine alternative Implementation des Statspack Package (SCPPKG.SQL) herunter zu laden und zu implementieren.

Diese Implementation enthält einen geänderten Hint, den ich im folgenden Beispiel mit Rot hervorgehoben habe.

Vom ganzen Insert Statement zeige ich nur den SELECT Teil, weil der Eintrag sonst zu lange wird.
Auch vom Select Teil habe ich die Liste der Spalten gekürzt, damit der Code Teil übersichtlich bleibt.

SELECT /*+ no_merge(new_plan) leading(new_plan s sp) use_nl(s) use_nl(sp) */
            new_plan.plan_hash_value,
            sp.id,
            MAX(sp.operation),
            MAX(sp.options),  
            . . .
            MAX(new_plan.snap_id)
        FROM
            (
                SELECT /*+ index(spu) */
                    spu.plan_hash_value,
                    spu.hash_value    hash_value,
                    spu.address       address,
                    spu.text_subset   text_subset,
                    spu.snap_id       snap_id
                FROM
                    stats$sql_plan_usage spu
                WHERE
                    spu.snap_id = :b3
                    AND spu.dbid = :b2
                    AND spu.instance_number = :b1
                    AND NOT EXISTS (
                        SELECT /*+ nl_aj */
                            *
                        FROM
                            stats$sql_plan ssp
                        WHERE
                            ssp.plan_hash_value = spu.plan_hash_value
                    )

Wie unschwer zu erkennen ist, befinden sie relevanten Suchkriterien auf der Tabelle stats$sql_plan_usage mit dem Alias spu.

Es ist also wichtig, dass im Execution Plan mit dem Lesen dieser Tabelle begonnen wird.

Der Hint Leading(new_plan .. ist also folgerichtig.

Das Problem besteht jedoch darin, dass new_plan keine Tabelle, sondern der Name einer Unterfrage ist.
Obwohl Version 19c den Hint als korrekt meldet, wird er in tieferen Versionen oft nicht akzeptiert.

Der Alias für den Hint wäre eigentlich spu, jedoch ist dieser in der Hauptabfrage nicht zugänglich, weil die Tabelle stats$sql_plan_usage in einer Unterabfrage angesprochen wird. (Achtung: wenn ein Alias vorhanden ist, muss der Alias im Hint angegeben werden und nicht der Tabelle Name.)

Diese Unterabfrage bildet einen eigenen Queryblock und dessen Inhalt ist von der Hauptabfrage nicht direkt referenzierbar.

In der Tat zeigt der Plan des Insert Befehles, dass der Leading Hint ignoriert wird.

Hier ein Beispiel von einem unserer Kunden:

Operation | Name | A-Time 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INSERT STATEMENT | |00:05:07.72
 LOAD TABLE CONVENTIONAL | STATS$SQL_PLAN |00:05:07.72
  SORT GROUP BY | |00:05:07.72
   NESTED LOOPS | |00:05:07.71
    NESTED LOOPS | |00:05:07.71
     FIXED TABLE FULL | X$KGLCURSOR_CHILD |00:00:02.30
     VIEW PUSHED PREDICATE | |00:05:05.33
      NESTED LOOPS ANTI | |00:05:05.23
       TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| STATS$SQL_PLAN_USAGE |00:03:42.53
        INDEX RANGE SCAN | STATS$SQL_PLAN_USAGE_PK|00:02:22.49
       INDEX RANGE SCAN | STATS$SQL_PLAN_PK |00:01:03.19
   FIXED TABLE FIXED INDEX | X$KQLFXPL (ind:3) |00:00:00.01
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wie man sieht, benötigt der Insert 5 Minuten und 8 Sekunden.

Queryblöcke

Um eine Queryblock in der Hauptabfrage referenzieren zu können, muss man dem untergeordneten Queryblock mit dem QB_NAME hint einen Namen geben.

Dann kann man die Tabellen des untergeordneten Queryblocks mittels „tabellenalias@queryblock“ ansprechen.
Dies ist ein dokumentiertes Vorgehen und sollte in allen Versionen stabil funktionieren.

In unserem Beispiel sieht das so aus:

SELECT /*+ leading(spu@np ssp@sq  s sp) */
            new_plan.plan_hash_value,
            sp.id,
... 
            MAX(new_plan.snap_id)
        FROM
            (
                SELECT /*+ QB_NAME(NP)  */  
                    spu.plan_hash_value,
                    spu.hash_value    hash_value,
                    spu.address       address,
                    spu.text_subset   text_subset,
                    spu.snap_id       snap_id
                FROM
                    stats$sql_plan_usage spu
                WHERE
                    spu.snap_id = :b3
                    AND spu.dbid = :b2
                    AND spu.instance_number = :b1
                            AND NOT EXISTS (
                        SELECT /*+ QB_NAME(SQ)  */
                            *
                        FROM
                            stats$sql_plan ssp
                        WHERE
                            ssp.plan_hash_value = spu.plan_hash_value
                    )
            ) new_plan,

Diesmal hält der Optimzer sich an die Hints, das Ergebnis sieht wie folgt aus:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operation                                | Name                     |   A-Time  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INSERT STATEMENT                         |                          |00:00:00.05
 LOAD TABLE CONVENTIONAL                 | STATS$SQL_PLAN           |00:00:00.05
  SORT GROUP BY                          |                          |00:00:00.05
   NESTED LOOPS                          |                          |00:00:00.05
    NESTED LOOPS                         |                          |00:00:00.04
     HASH JOIN ANTI                      |                          |00:00:00.04
      TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED| STATS$SQL_PLAN_USAGE     |00:00:00.01
       INDEX RANGE SCAN                  | STATS$SQL_PLAN_USAGE_PK  |00:00:00.01
      INDEX FAST FULL SCAN               | STATS$SQL_PLAN_PK        |00:00:00.01
     FIXED TABLE FIXED INDEX             | X$KGLCURSOR_CHILD (ind:1)|00:00:00.01
    FIXED TABLE FIXED INDEX              | X$KQLFXPL (ind:3)        |00:00:00.01
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Also 5 hundertstel Sekunden statt 5 Minuten.

Das ist über 6000x schneller und kann sich sehen lassen.

Nachdem ich die Hints gefunden hatte, habe ich eine Sicherheitskopie des Scriptes SCPPKG.SQL angelegt und den neuen Hint in das Package kopiert.
Durch den Aufruf des Scriptes wurde das neue Package dann installiert.

Statement: INSERT INTO stats$seg_stat

Wie sieht nun das zweite Insert aus?

Diesmal gibt es keine MOS Note.

Auch hier zeige ich wieder den sql code, mit den hervorgehobenen Hints:

SELECT /*+  ordered use_nl(s1.gv$segstat.X$KSOLSFTS) */
            :b3,
            :b2,
...
            SUM(decode(s1.statistic_name, 'row lock waits', value, 0))
        FROM
            v$segstat s1
        WHERE
            ( s1.dataobj#,
              s1.obj#,
              s1.ts# ) IN (
                SELECT /*+ unnest */
                    s2.dataobj#,
                    s2.obj#,
                    s2.ts#
                FROM
                    v$segstat s2
                WHERE
                    s2.obj# > 0
                    AND s2.obj# < 4254950912
                    AND ( decode(s2.statistic_name, 'logical reads', s2.value, 0) > :b10
                          OR decode(s2.statistic_name, 'physical reads', s2.value, 0) > :b9
                          OR decode(s2.statistic_name, 'buffer busy waits', s2.value, 0) > :b8
                          OR decode(s2.statistic_name, 'row lock waits', s2.value, 0) > :b7
                          OR decode(s2.statistic_name, 'ITL waits', s2.value, 0) > :b6
                          OR decode(s2.statistic_name, 'gc cr blocks received', s2.value, 0) > :b5
                          OR decode(s2.statistic_name, 'gc current blocks received', s2.value, 0) > :b4 )
            )
        GROUP BY
            s1.ts#,
            s1.obj#,
            s1.dataobj#
;

Wieder sieht man hier ein sehr ungewöhnliches Hint Format.

Wieder meldet aber die Report Funktion in 19c keinen Fehler und in unseren Test hat der Optimizer den Hint befolgt.

Jedoch bin ich diesmal mit der Wirkung des Hints nicht einverstanden.

Sehen wir uns dazu Laufzeitstatitiken an:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Id  | Operation                | Name          | Starts | A-Rows |   A-Time   
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  0 | INSERT STATEMENT         |               |      1 |      0 |00:01:16.83 
  1 |  LOAD TABLE CONVENTIONAL | STATS$SEG_STAT|      1 |      0 |00:01:16.83 
  2 |   HASH GROUP BY          |               |      1 |    746 |00:01:16.83 
  3 |    NESTED LOOPS          |               |      1 |  19396 |00:01:16.81 
  4 |     VIEW                 | VW_NSO_1      |      1 |    747 |00:00:00.19 
  5 |      SORT UNIQUE         |               |      1 |    747 |00:00:00.19 
  6 |       FIXED TABLE FULL   | X$KSOLSFTS    |      1 |    814 |00:00:00.19 
  7 |     FIXED TABLE FULL     | X$KSOLSFTS    |    747 |  19396 |00:01:16.62 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Immerhin läuft auch dieser Befehl noch über eine Minute.

Die Zeit fällt fast zu 100% in der Zeile 7 an und zwar deshalb, weil die Zeile 747 Mal wiederholt wird.

Ein Hash join wäre hier wesentlich Laufzeit stabiler.
Der Nested Loop join hat Vorteile bei kleinen Datenmengen.

Allerdings spielt es ohnehin keine Rolle, welchen Join man nimmt, bei kleinen Datenmengen sind alle schnell.

Ich habe also den use_nl hint gegen einen use_hash hint getauscht.

Das ist das Resultat:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Id  | Operation                | Name           | Starts | A-Rows |   A-Time   
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  0 | INSERT STATEMENT         |                |      1 |      0 |00:00:00.39 
  1 |  LOAD TABLE CONVENTIONAL | STATS$SEG_STAT |      1 |      0 |00:00:00.39 
  2 |   HASH GROUP BY          |                |      1 |    748 |00:00:00.39 
  3 |    HASH JOIN             |                |      1 |  19448 |00:00:00.38 
  4 |     VIEW                 | VW_NSO_1       |      1 |    748 |00:00:00.19 
  5 |      SORT UNIQUE         |                |      1 |    748 |00:00:00.19 
  6 |       FIXED TABLE FULL   | X$KSOLSFTS     |      1 |    815 |00:00:00.19 
  7 |     FIXED TABLE FULL     | X$KSOLSFTS     |      1 |    390K|00:00:00.13 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Insgesamt läuft der Snapshot jetzt in 6 Sekunden durch.

DBConcepts auf den DOAG Datenbank Tagen in Düsseldorf

Zum ersten Mal war heuer DBConcepts auf den DOAG Datenbank Tagen als Sponsor vertreten, welche vom 3. Juni bis 4. Juni in Düsseldorf stattgefunden haben.

In Summe über 200 Teilnehmer/innen informierten sich in zahlreichen Vorträgen über aktuelle Entwicklungen und Trends im Oracle Datenbank Umfeld.

Unser Kollege und Oracle Performance Tuning Spezialist Lothar Flatz gab in seinem Vortrag mit dem Titel „Trouble im Shared Pool“ seine sehr interessanten Einblicke und Erfahrungen preis.

Durch den hohen Bekanntheitsgrad und seine besonders geschätzte Expertise kam es zur erwarteten Überlastung des Vortragraumes.

Leider konnten die Veranstalter nicht rechtzeitig reagieren, woduch circa 30 Teilnehmer den Ausführungen stehend folgen mussten.
Dieser Umstand tat aber der Begeisterung über den Vortrag keinen Abbruch.

Viele Besucher am DBConcepts Ausstellerstand informierten sich über das Leistungsspektrum der „Oracle Experten“ aus Österreich und meldeten sich zusätzlich zum DBConcepts Newsletter an.

Bei den zahlreichen Gesprächen kristallisierte sich heraus, dass der Großteil der Besucher DBConcpts bereits kannten und als Experten im Oracle Technologie Umfeld in Verbindung bringen.

Wir halten allen Teilnehmer/innen unseres Euromillionen-Gewinnspiel die Daumen, dass die Glücksfee bei ihnen vorbei kommt 🙂

DOAG Datenbank Tag 2019 Messestand von DBConcepts

 

Überfüllter Vortrag von Lothar Flatz Trouble im Shared Pool

 

 

Datenbank Performance Problem und Lösung

Performance Problem: Eine parallele Abfrage stellt ihre Arbeit ein

Kürzlich traf ich bei einem Kunden auf einen ungewöhnlichen Bug der Oracle Version 12.2.
Es handelt sich um eine parallele Abfrage, die scheinbar einfach anhält und ihre Arbeit einstellt. 🙁

Bei näherer Betrachtung erkennt man eine interne Verklemmung zwischen den Koorditinatorprozess und einem der Parallelprozesse. Das Ganze ähnelt einem Dead Lock!

Problem Analyse

Beide Prozesse warten auf „table queue“ Kommunikation.

Der Query Coordinator wartet mit „PX Deq: Execute Reply“ und der blockiernde Parallel Process wartet mit „PX Deq: Table Q Normal“.

Der Rest der Parallelprozesse warten mit dem event „PX Deq: Execution Msg“.

Damit es zum besagten Problem kommt, muß auch eine analytic_function beteiligt sein.

Im Kern geht es darum, wie Oracle den Window Sort parallelisiert, der mit einer analytic function zwangsweise verbunden ist.

In früheren Oracle Versionen war dieser Sort of weniger effizient als ein regulärer Sort und daher entsprechend langsamer.

In dem sehr gute Post von Phythian’s Christo Kutrovsky wird das Thema im Detail beschrieben: Oracle parallel query hints reference – part 5: PQ_DISTRIBUTE_WINDOW

Problem Lösung

Für unsere Zwecke genügt es zunächst festzuhalten, dass es drei Methoden gibt, wie ein Window Sort parallelisiert werden kann.

Methode 3 ist die bisher verwendete Methode, Methode 1 und 2 sind neu in Version 12. Wenn Methode 2 verwendet wird, kann es zum oben beschriebenen Bug kommen.

Mein Kollege Andreas Schlögl hat einen Testcase erstellt und gezeigt, dass man mittels des neuen  PQ_DISTRIBUTE_WINDOW Hint den Bug umgehen kann, in dem man auf Methode 1 umstellt.

Den Code des Testcases finden Sie hier. Viel Spass beim ausprobieren!

rem ##################################
rem # Objects                        #
rem ##################################

alter session set optimizer_adaptive_plans = false;
alter system flush shared_pool;

drop table asc_dmy1;
drop table asc_dmy3;

create table asc_dmy1
parallel 8
as 
select 'AAA' f001
  from xmltable('1 to 300');
  
--note: this table has no parallel degree
create table asc_dmy3
as
select 'AAA' f001, 1 acc206
  from dual;

rem #############################################
rem # SORT then distribute by HASH (Bug)        #
rem #############################################  
/*
   leads to a HASH JOIN in Line 7, which imo must be a HASH JOIN BUFFERED (due to 2 active PX SENDs at 9 and 13) 
   This SQL hangs and never finishes 
   
   https://oracle-randolf.blogspot.com/2012/12/hash-join-buffered.html
   "At most one data distribution can be active at the same time"
   
   "Since it doesn't seem to be supported to have two PX SEND operations active at the same time, 
    some artificial blocking operation needs to be introduced, in this case the HASH JOIN BUFFERED, 
	that first consumes the second row source completely before starting the actual probe phase"
*/
select /*+ pq_distribute_window(@"SEL$1" 2) */
       max(v.acc206) over (partition by v.f001) max_bew
  from asc_dmy3 v,
       asc_dmy1 e
 where e.f001 = v.f001
   and v.f001 = e.f001;  

/*   
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name     | E-Rows |E-Bytes| Cost (%CPU)| E-Time   |    TQ  |IN-OUT| PQ Distrib |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |          |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |        |      |            |
|   1 |  PX COORDINATOR              |          |        |       |            |          |        |      |            |
|   2 |   PX SEND QC (RANDOM)        | :TQ10003 |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,03 | P->S | QC (RAND)  |
|   3 |    WINDOW CONSOLIDATOR BUFFER|          |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,03 | PCWP |            |
|   4 |     PX RECEIVE               |          |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,03 | PCWP |            |
|   5 |      PX SEND HASH            | :TQ10002 |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | P->P | HASH       |
|   6 |       WINDOW SORT            |          |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |
|*  7 |        HASH JOIN             |          |      1 |   419 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |
|   8 |         PX RECEIVE           |          |      1 |   415 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |
|   9 |          PX SEND HASH        | :TQ10000 |      1 |   415 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,00 | S->P | HASH       |
|  10 |           PX SELECTOR        |          |        |       |            |          |  Q1,00 | SCWC |            |
|  11 |            TABLE ACCESS FULL | ASC_DMY3 |      1 |   415 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,00 | SCWP |            |
|  12 |         PX RECEIVE           |          |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |
|  13 |          PX SEND HASH        | :TQ10001 |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,01 | P->P | HASH       |
|  14 |           PX BLOCK ITERATOR  |          |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,01 | PCWC |            |
|  15 |            TABLE ACCESS FULL | ASC_DMY1 |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,01 | PCWP |            |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   
*/

rem #############################################
rem # distribute by HASH then SORT  (Success)   #
rem #############################################  
/*
   leads to a HASH JOIN *BUFFERED* in Line 6, which is inevitably necessary imo
   This SQL finishes immediately
*/ 
select /*+ pq_distribute_window(@"SEL$1" 1) */
       max(v.acc206) over (partition by v.f001) max_bew
  from asc_dmy3 v,
       asc_dmy1 e
 where e.f001 = v.f001
   and v.f001 = e.f001;    

/*
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                  | Name     | E-Rows |E-Bytes| Cost (%CPU)| E-Time   |    TQ  |IN-OUT| PQ Distrib |  OMem |  1Mem |  O/1/M   |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |          |        |       |     6 (100)|          |        |      |            |       |       |          |
|   1 |  PX COORDINATOR            |          |        |       |            |          |        |      |            | 73728 | 73728 |          |
|   2 |   PX SEND QC (RANDOM)      | :TQ10003 |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,03 | P->S | QC (RAND)  |       |       |          |
|   3 |    WINDOW SORT             |          |      1 |   419 |     6  (17)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,03 | PCWP |            | 20480 | 20480 |     8/0/0|
|   4 |     PX RECEIVE             |          |      1 |   419 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,03 | PCWP |            |       |       |          |
|   5 |      PX SEND HASH          | :TQ10002 |      1 |   419 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | P->P | HASH       |       |       |          |
|*  6 |       HASH JOIN BUFFERED   |          |      1 |   419 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |  3400K|  3091K|     8/0/0| 
|   7 |        PX RECEIVE          |          |      1 |   415 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |       |       |          |
|   8 |         PX SEND HASH       | :TQ10000 |      1 |   415 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,00 | S->P | HASH       |       |       |          |
|   9 |          PX SELECTOR       |          |        |       |            |          |  Q1,00 | SCWC |            |       |       |          |
|  10 |           TABLE ACCESS FULL| ASC_DMY3 |      1 |   415 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,00 | SCWP |            |       |       |          |
|  11 |        PX RECEIVE          |          |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,02 | PCWP |            |       |       |          |
|  12 |         PX SEND HASH       | :TQ10001 |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,01 | P->P | HASH       |       |       |          |
|  13 |          PX BLOCK ITERATOR |          |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,01 | PCWC |            |       |       |          |
|* 14 |           TABLE ACCESS FULL| ASC_DMY1 |    300 |  1200 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,01 | PCWP |            |       |       |          |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/

ORACLE Datenbank Performance Tuning. Ein Überblick

In unserer Video-Serie „Kurz&Knackig“ sprechen wir mit unserem Kollegen  Lothar Flatz, der als Oracle Performance Architekt in zahlreichen Tuning-Projekten große Erfolge erzielen konnte.

Als unser ausgewiesener TOP-Experte im Bereich Performance Tuning wird er gerufen, um die Effizienz von langsamen Applikationen wesentlich zu steigern.

13min Kurz-Interview zum Thema Oracle Datenbank Performance Tuning

Vorteile von Code-Tuning vs. Hardware

Während bei Performance Problemen Investitionen in Hardware in den meisten Fällen nur einen Wirkungsfaktor im einstelligen Bereich aufweisen, können Verbesserungen im Code eine Effizienzsteigerung um einen vielfachen Faktor bewirken.

Beim Code-Tuning wird das verursachende Problem in der Applikation aufgespürt und beseitigt.
Im Gegensatz dazu bleibt beim Hardware-Tuning das Problem im Code bestehen, wodurch so gut wie immer das Problem zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt wiederholt auftritt.  

In der Regel ist Code-Tuning noch dazu deutlich preiswerter als ein Hardware-Investment und auch in kürzerer Zeit umgesetzt.

Vorträge und Einblicke

Lothar ist „Oracle ACE“ und „Oak Table Member“ und neben seiner Tätigkeit bei uns als Oracle Performance Architekt ein viel gefragter Redner auf Oracle User Konferenzen im deutschsprachigen- und europäischen Raum.

Bei seinen kurzweiligen Vorträgen lässt er seine Expertise zum Thema Performance Optimierung auf unterhaltsame Weise einfließen.

Fragen & Antworten

Falls Sie Fragen zum Thema Datenbank Performance Tuning haben, nutzen Sie bitte unser Kontaktformular (Link).

 

Dimensio Performance Vergleich

Dimensio – der Datenbankturbo

Die neue Softwarelösung Dimensio beschleunigt die Antwortzeiten bestehender Datenbanksysteme durch einen mehrdimensionalen, semantischen Index auf einen Bruchteil der Zeit, ohne direkt in die Datenbank oder in die Applikation einzugreifen.

Aufgrund stetig wachsender Datenmengen geraten Unternehmen bei der Analyse der gesammelten Daten immer öfter an die Grenze der Möglichkeiten ihrer IT Landschaft. Dies führt zwangsläufig dazu, dass in bestehenden Anwendungen die Ausführung geschäftskritischer Auswertungen oft viele Stunden bis Tage in Anspruch nimmt.

In vielen Fällen wird versucht dieses Performanceproblem durch neue, leistungsstärkere Hardware in den Griff zu bekommen. Dieser Ansatz führt aber nur zu einem Verschieben der Grenzen ohne die eigentliche Problematik zu lösen und kann neben den zusätzlichen Betriebskosten auch eine wesentliche Erhöhung der Lizenzkosten für die Datenbanksoftware notwendig machen.

Klaus-Michael Hatzinger von DBConcepts ist von der Leistung von Dimensio begeistert und sieht für viele leidgeprüfte Anwender von altgedienten Anwendungen ein Ende der langen Wartezeiten gekommen.

„Dimensio erstellt einen mehrdimensionalen, semantischen Index. Das Verfahren verwendet künstliche neuronale Netze zur parameterlosen Klassifikation und ist dadurch in der Lage, die Datensätze in einer Datenbank gemäß deren inhaltlichem Zusammenhang zu gruppieren und in einer sogenannten V-Baum Struktur zu verwalten. erklärt Klaus-Michael Hatzinger die technische Besonderheit der Lösung.

„Dabei erkennt Dimensio alle für seinen Index passenden Abfragen, ergänzt diese durch die eindeutigen Primärschlüssel der betroffenen Datensätze und gibt sie an die Datenbank weiter“, führt der Datenbankexperte und Geschäftsführer von DBConcepts weiter aus.

„Die Datenbank muss nur noch einen Bruchteil der Datensätze auswählen und benötigt daher auch wesentlich weniger Zeit. Komplexe Abfragen werden nur noch ein Tausendstel der Zeit benötigen und ihren Schrecken verlieren“, ist sich Klaus-Michael Hatzinger sicher.

„Die Integration von Dimensio erfolgt auf Netzwerkebene und ist mit sehr geringem Aufwand verbunden. Befürchtungen hinsichtlich langwieriger Projektlaufzeiten oder eventueller Garantieverletzungen sind mit dieser Methode unbegründet“, freut sich Klaus-Michael Hatzinger über die einfache und rasche Möglichkeit die Software zu implementieren.

Dimensio kann neben Oracle auch für jede andere Datenbank unabhängig vom Hersteller eingesetzt werden. Selbst kundenspezifische Speicherlösungen oder auch Flat Files sind möglich.

Zahlreiche Beispiele aus der Praxis belegen die hohen Erwartungen, die an die Dimensio gestellt werden können. Bei einem Anwendungsbeispiel in der Automobilindustrie wurde ein wöchentlicher Materialnachweis mit circa 4.000 Anfragen erstellt. Der Datenbestand umfasste rund 25.000 Produkte mit ungefähr 250 Dimensionen. Die bisher eingesetzte Lösung benötigte am Mainframe in Summe mehr als sechs Stunden Laufzeit, die auf einem einfachen Desktop PC eingesetzte Dimensio Lösung konnte das gleiche Ergebnis bereits in drei Minuten und zwanzig Sekunden liefern.

Wie bei allen großen Performance Sprüngen könnte Dimensio durch den erheblichen Zeitgewinn bei vielen Anwendern die Begehrlichkeiten nach immer komplexeren Abfragen erst so richtig anfeuern.